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The View From Castle Rock

Cover of The View From Castle Rock

The View From Castle Rock

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Alice Munro’s brilliant new collection of stories, the follow-up to the New York Times Best Book of the Year Runaway. Some of these personal stories are imagined from Alice Munro’s family history....
Alice Munro’s brilliant new collection of stories, the follow-up to the New York Times Best Book of the Year Runaway. Some of these personal stories are imagined from Alice Munro’s family history....
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Description-
  • Alice Munro’s brilliant new collection of stories, the follow-up to the New York Times Best Book of the Year Runaway. Some of these personal stories are imagined from Alice Munro’s family history. Some are set in Scotland, where good liquor and amorous adventures temper the hard lives of legendary forbears in a place described by local records as having “no advantages.” Others take place in the more familiar Munro territory around Lake Huron. All will amaze and delight listeners with their rich insights and astonishing epiphanies.

 
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  • From the book

    No Advantages

    This parish possesses no advantages. Upon the hills the soil is in many places mossy and fit for nothing. The air in general is moist. This is occasioned by the height of the hills which continually attract the clouds and the vapour that is continually exhaled from the mossy ground . . . The nearest market town is fifteen miles away and the roads so deep as to be almost impassable. The snow also at times is a great inconvenience, often for many months we can have no intercourse with mankind. And a great disadvantage is the want of bridges so that the traveller is obstructed when the waters are swelled . . . Barley oats and potatoes are the only crops raised. Wheat rye turnips and cabbage are never attempted . . .

    There are ten proprietors of land in this parish: none of them resides in it.

    Contribution by the Minister of Ettrick Parish, in the county of Selkirk, to the Statistical Account of Scotland, 1799




    The Ettrick Valley lies about fifty miles due south of Edinburgh, and thirty or so miles north of the English border, which runs close to the wall Hadrian built to keep out the wild people from the north. The Romans pushed farther, and built some sort of fortifications called Antonine's Wall between the Firth of Clyde and the Firth of Forth, but those did not last long. The land between the two walls has been occupied for a long time by a mix of people--Celtic people, some of whom came from Ireland and were actually called Scots, Anglo-Saxons from the south, Norse from across the North Sea, and possibly some leftover Picts as well.

    The high stony farm where my family lived for some time in the Ettrick Valley was called Far-Hope. The word hope, as used in the local geography, is an old word, a Norse word--Norse, Anglo-Saxon, and Gaelic words being all mixed up together in that part of the country, as you would expect, with some old Brythonic thrown in to indicate an early Welsh presence. Hope means a bay, not a bay filled with water but with land, partly enclosed by hills, which in this case are the high bare hills, the near mountains of the Southern Uplands. The Black Knowe, Bodesbeck Law, Ettrick Pen--there you have the three big hills, with the word hill in three languages. Some of these hills are now being reforested, with plantations of Sitka spruce, but in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries they would have been bare, or mostly bare--the great Forest of Ettrick, the hunting grounds of the Kings of Scotland, having been cut down and turned into pasture or waste heath a century or two before.

    The height of land above Far-Hope, which stands right at the end of the valley, is the spine of Scotland, marking the division of the waters that flow to the west into the Solway Firth and the Atlantic Ocean, from those that flow east into the North Sea. Within ten miles to the north is the country's most famous waterfall, the Grey Mare's Tail. Five miles from Moffat, which would be the market town to those living at the valley head, is the Devil's Beef Tub, a great cleft in the hills believed to be the hiding place for stolen cattle--English cattle, that is, taken by the reivers in the lawless sixteenth century. In the lower Ettrick Valley was Aikwood, the home of Michael Scott, the philosopher and wizard of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, who appears in Dante's Inferno. And if that were not enough, William Wallace, the guerrilla hero of the Scots, is said to have hidden out here from the English, and there is a story of Merlin--Merlin--being...

Reviews-
  • AudioFile Magazine Fiction? Memoir? Genealogy? Whatever you choose to call it, this book marks a distinct departure for Munro. The first half traces her father's Scottish relatives and their journey to Canada in the early 1800s: "Their words and my words, a curious recreation of lives." It takes a while to form an identification with men and women whose names have been quickly rattled off, but Kimberly Farr's agile rendering of each character's unique speech pattern helps set them all forth as individuals. The second half of the volume contains stories that Munro never included in her other collections--not memoirs exactly, but fiction drawing from a more autobiographical base. Everything comes full circle in the end, a fascinating blend of past and present. R.R. (c) AudioFile 2007, Portland, Maine
  • Pico Iyer, Newsweek Magazine
    "Break[s] every rule ever taught in a writing seminar, setting up a master class along the sidelines . . . Yet it shows, as usual, how to draw gasps from other writers by defying the laws of gravitas as effortlessly as Michael Jordan defied those of gravity."
  • Jennifer Haigh, Chicago Tribune "Sublime . . . Late in her career, and late in life, Alice Munro seems unencumbered by the laurels heaped upon her. She continues to charge forward, shining a light on what is most fearsome and true."
  • Michael Upchruch, The Seattle Times "In her astonishing new collection, Munro delves into the past . . . Result: a far-ranging, richly symphonic suite of stories that outshines even Munro's earlier masterworks."
  • Geraldine Brooks, the front page of The Washington Post Book World "Munro is the illusionist whose trick can never be exposed. And that is because there is no smoke, there are no mirrors. Munro really does know magic: how to summon the spirits and the emotions that animate our lives."
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    All copies of this title, including those transferred to portable devices and other media, must be deleted/destroyed at the end of the lending period.
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